Vol. 69, No. 3

EDITORIAL

We trust our readers will forgive us some blowing of our own trumpet as we celebrate the seventieth anniversary of the first issue of Theatre Notebook. This issue reflects some perennial concerns of Theatre Notebook with consideration of eighteenth-century Italian opera in London, Frank Benson’s Shakespeare productions and Pepper’s Ghost as well as an essay on Donald Wolfit, who is seldom accorded serious academic scrutiny. The authors also reflect the heterogeneity of contributors to the journal: two scholars based in England who entered the recent STR New Scholars Essay Competition, both publishing academic work relatively late in their careers outside higher education, an American scholar based in Turkey and a third late entrant into the area of academic theatre history.


BRIEFLY NOTED

DRAMA AT THE PALACE. VICTORIAN HEYDAY: THE ALEXANDRA PALACE THEATRE 1873-1901
The Theatre of Drottningholm: Then and Now; Performance between the 18th and 21st centuries
NEW ONLINE RESOURCE: The Romantic Illustration Network Shakespeare Gallery romanticillustrationnetwork.wordpress.com/shakespeare-gallery/


FACSIMILE REPRODUCTION OF THEATRE NOTEBOOK VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1, 1948.


70 YEARS OF THEATRE NOTEBOOK
By Geoff Davidson

Any publication that has lasted for seventy years will have gone through many changes in its lifetime ­ not only its content, its readership and the way it is produced and distributed but also its editors and managerial helpers and advisors. Theatre Notebook is no different. It began as an idea of Ifan Kyrle Fletcher at the end of World War Two, in 1945, and developed for the next few years under the guidance and editorship of Sybil Rosenfeld and Richard Southern, with Fletcher as its manager and publisher. There was an excitement and drive in their work in those early years. Like many of the earlier contributors they were amateurs in theatre history, in the sense that they studied it purely out of personal enthusiasm. (At the time there was in any case only the beginnings of an academic discipline of theatre history in Britain and its borders were ill-defined.) Initially, the call was to gather information about what knowledge was available about the history of British theatre and to encourage articles suitable for publication. In a challenge to themselves and potential contributors, the editors said “There are many fields to touch”. Writing in the fiftieth issue of Theatre Notebook Sybil Rosenfeld acknowledged Fletcher as…


APPENDIX

A list of editors, review editors, indexers, advisors, managers, and editorial assistants, from 1948-present.

 

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